Rice Salad with Mango and Black Beans

By Abby Henry Singh November 9, 2017Recipes, Salads, Sides

This one pot rice dish is hearty and easy to throw together. This dish is a great source of protein, fiber, and cancer-fighting phytochemicals.

This recipe calls for mango, tomato, and green onion, but feel free to add additional fruits or vegetables of your choice.

Ingredients

Rice Salad with Mango and Black Beans

2 cups cooked brown rice (see note)
1 (15 oz.) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup diced mango, 1/4-inch cubes
1/2 cup chopped and seeded plum tomato
1/3 cup chopped green onion, white and green parts

Dressing

1/3 cup orange juice
1-2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 serrano chile pepper, or 1-2 inch piece jalapeño pepper, coarsely chopped (see note)
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. dried oregano
1 Tbsp. canola oil
Salt and ground black pepper
2-3 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro

Directions

1. Combine rice, beans, mango, tomatoes and green onion in mixing bowl. This step may be done
up to 2 hours before serving with salad covered and refrigerated.

2. For dressing, in blender or bowl of mini-food processor, mix orange and lime juice, chile
pepper, cumin and oregano until chile is ground up. Add oil and whirl to blend. Season to taste
with salt and pepper. This may be done up to 2 hours before serving. Be sure to keep dressing refrigerated.

3. Just before serving, pour dressing over salad and toss with fork to combine (if salad has been
refrigerated, let sit at room temperature for 20 minutes before dressing). Spoon salad into wide,
shallow serving bowl, and sprinkle on cilantro if desired. Serve immediately.

Notes
If you like, use frozen brown rice prepared according to package directions. Cool the rice to room temperature before combining with salad ingredients.

A Serrano chile gives more heat, while seeding and removing ribs reduces heat. For the least heat, use bottom end of a large jalapeño pepper.

Per serving: 284 calories, 5 g total fat (<1 g saturated fat), 51 g carbohydrate, 10 g protein, 10 g dietary fiber, 201 mg sodium.

 

Recipe from the American Institute for Cancer Research.

Abby Henry Singh

Author Abby Henry Singh

Manger Content, Outreach, and Outcomes Abby Henry Singh is a native of Sevierville, Tennessee, and a graduate of Belmont University with a bachelor’s degree in English and history. She has been a member of PearlPoint Cancer Support for over 5 years. Previously, Singh was the Program and Outreach Manger for the Lupus Foundation of America, Mid-South Chapter where she worked to raise disease awareness and support those diagnosed with the disease through educational programs. She is a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority and the Belmont English alumni book club.

More posts by Abby Henry Singh